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Photo Enforcement

  • Are red light cameras unethical?

    Red Light Camera InstallationFew traffic enforcement schemes raise the ire of the modern driver more than electronic ticketing. These systems take several forms, including speed enforcement, toll booth cameras, and the like. One type of ticketing system considered particularly annoying to many drivers, and perhaps even downright dangerous, may also be the most unethical. It's the red light camera.

    The traffic light is crucial to safety at an intersection. It is designed to keep the flow of traffic moving in multiple directions in a regimented and organized way. Of course, the effectiveness of this device depends on the full compliance by every driver to obey traffic light signals, without exception. Go on green, slow and prepare to stop on yellow, and come to a full stop on red. It's a simple concept for drivers to understand and follow, and for most part the system works very well.

    The downside to this system is that it relies on the willingness of every driver to follow the rules completely. The truth is, drivers are not machines, they are human, and being human, they do not always follow the rules. If one person does not obey the traffic light signals, particularly when the light turns red, the results can be more than just disruptive, they can be deadly.

    For this reason, there are laws to ensure compliance by all drivers, and law enforcement agencies invoke tickets, fines and other penalties to deter those drivers who violate them.

    Unfortunately, things happen, sometimes intended, sometimes not, and a driver may run a red light, placing that individual and everyone else around at risk.

    Enter the red light camera. Cameras are placed at an intersection to monitor red light runners and catch them in the act, recording their moving violation for ticketing electronically by mail.

    At the outset, the concept of the red light camera is a logical one, an almost foolproof, technologically advanced solution to purportedly save lives. In fact, studies have shown that in many cases, red light camera ticketing systems reduced the number of front and side collisions at intersections by as much as thirty percent! Certainly there is no downside to that!

    But like every coin, there is another side to the story. In addition to tickets, red light cameras also generate ticket revenue, a lot of revenue. Red light camera systems bring in millions to the companies that operate them, and contribute serious cash to city coffers and municipalities that allow them to be installed.

    On the surface, that doesn't seem like such a bad deal. Enforce the traffic laws, save lives, and profit in the process. It's a win-win, right?

    Well, not exactly. In many situations, it's more like a win-lose.

    For one, The companies that install and operate these devices are not law enforcement agencies, nor are they DOT engineers. Yet, it seems that the contracts with these companies allow them to have a lot of latitude in the decisions as to where and how these red light cameras are installed and used.

    One would think that these red light cameras would be placed at the intersections which need them the most to deter violators and increase traffic safety. Some of these intersections are not always high traffic areas, they are simply more dangerous and prone to accidents caused by red light runners.

    Instead, more often than not, the cameras wind up installed at the busiest intersections rather than the most dangerous ones, with the placement simply based on the volume of traffic at an intersection, nothing more. Such arbitrary placement raises the suspicion and argument that red light cameras exist to raise revenue, not promote safety, especially when they are installed in cash strapped communities.

    Another issue is the yellow light. The yellow light was initially created as a safety feature of the conventional traffic light system. It exists to warn drivers that the light is about to turn red, allowing the drivers time to prepare for a safe stop.

    But that's not its application at many intersections where red light cameras are installed. To increase the likelihood of catching, or to more accurately put it, ensnaring red light runners on camera, the yellow light is often shortened considerably, sometimes to only one or two seconds, giving the driver little to no preparation at all to safely stop in time. Some drivers have even reported the complete absence of the yellow light, increasing the chances of causing an unintentional violation, an accident, or both.

    And there's more. Other studies have shown that while red light cameras reduce the number of front and side collisions, the number of rear-end collisions actually increase by roughly the same margins, thereby offsetting the reduction of the others. Sometimes known as the bumper car effect, these collisions occur when drivers suddenly slam on their brakes to avoid an instantaneous red light camera trap and get rear ended by one or more vehicles behind them who were also caught by surprise. It is a rather common occurrence and supports the argument that the red light cameras themselves are a safety hazard. It is also a detail often glossed over or omitted from studies performed that favor these devices.

    That's not all. These red light cameras are supposed to catch violators who blow through an intersection after the light turns red. Unfortunately, they are often set up so that drivers who are already in the intersection lawfully when the light changes may be caught and ticketed as well. This can often occur if a driver is stuck in an intersection while waiting to make a left hand turn and oncoming traffic is heavy or the driver yields to pedestrians in the crosswalk towards which the vehicle is turning.

    In addition, the sensors for these red light cameras are often calibrated to detect a vehicle that may cross the stop line at an intersection or overshoot it a little. In this scenario, the vehicle certainly comes to a full stop and doesn't run the light. The driver may have merely misjudged the line, or perhaps overshot it a little bit if the light changed to red without ample warning and forced a sudden stop. In this case, the driver would clearly be attempting to obey the law, but gets ticketed anyway.

    These red light cameras have also been known to catch and ticket drivers who makes a right hand turn at a stoplight, at intersections where it is perfectly lawful to do so. Getting a ticket for obeying the law doesn't exactly generate the warm fuzzies for red light cameras, or for the entities that run them.

    It doesn't help when a red light camera is set up in such a way that it captures the driver of the vehicle that allegedly commits the violation, but tickets the owner of said vehicle and holds that individual liable. The driver and owner are not always one and the same, yet the system doesn't seem to care. This certainly isn't fair, and adds more ammo to the argument that red light cameras do not exist to promulgate safety, prevent accidents or punish transgressors, but simply to produce profit, and as much as possible, any way they can.

    It added points on your license? You weren't at the wheel? Too bad. Sorry for you. It doesn't matter who gets the ticket, as long as it brings in the revenue.

    Of course, these electronic tickets generated from red light cameras can be contested in traffic court. Many are, and often successfully so. However, the tickets are usually priced strategically at a threshold, not to deter red light running, but to maximize the odds that the unlucky recipients will decide to simply pay the ticket instead of disputing it. After all, taking a day off to go to court, especially if it's not in your immediate area, is a hassle. And if you live in another city or another state, it may cost more to make the trip to the courthouse than the ticket is worth.

    The red light camera companies know this. The cities that cater to them know this too. They're not just aware of it. They may even be counting on it.

    The dark alliance between these red light camera companies and the municipalities that patronize them is a troubling one, especially considering some of the practices involved in the installation and operation of these devices in many areas of the country. For municipalities blinded by dollar signs, the lure of easy revenue under the pretense of public safety is difficult to resist. For red light camera companies, their past performance and ethics - or lack of them - clearly indicate it's all about the money.

    Many drivers are exasperated with the red light camera systems, and some are just fed up. They view them as revenue streams for governments while increasing risks on roads. Many consider red light camera systems unethical, and even downright dangerous. Many view them as accidents waiting to happen.

    Fortunately, a few states are listening to drivers, and are addressing the issue of red light cameras by enacting some restrictions on their use, or passing legislation to ban them altogether.

    One state that paved the way was Mississippi. In 2009, the state passed a law to remove existing red light cameras and outlaw the installation of any new ones. Arizona said goodbye to red light cameras the following year. Several other states also banned red light cameras, and many more passed laws to restrict their use to certain locations, jurisdictions or situations.

    The latest state to join the caravan is Texas. In June 2019, Texas banned the use of red light cameras. It also plans to remove existing systems already installed across the state at the end of their contracts. Here is a list of states that currently ban red light cameras.

    Although some states now have laws on the books that prohibit or limit the use of red light cameras, there are many more states that either embrace these devices, or have no laws on their use at all.

    If you live in or visit an area equipped with red light cameras, be mindful when driving through intersections on those roads. Here are a few quick tips to make it past a red light camera lawfully, safely, and avoid a ticket:

    • Be careful when approaching such intersections.
    • Provide as much distance between you and the vehicle ahead as is reasonably possible.
    • Be prepared to stop with little to no warning.
    • Avoid sitting in the middle of an intersection while waiting to make a left hand turn.
    • Don't pull out into an intersection to turn if the light is changing.
    • Avoid leaning past the stop line when stopping at an intersection with a red light.
    • Also, be extremely careful when making a right turn on red. It may be legal, but it may not stop you from getting an electronic ticket anyway.

    Many drivers are particularly anxious about intersections equipped with red light cameras, and try to avoid them altogether when possible. Some intersections have them, others don't, so one may be able to plan a route with a minimum number red light cameras on the way, and in some areas it may be possible change your route to avoid them altogether. This is where a radar detector can help.

    Many radar detectors available today feature red light camera detection. These detectors are usually equipped with a database of all known locations and intersections where red light cameras are installed or actively in use. Here is a list of current radar detectors with red light and speed camera detection.

    There are also products available that offer a countermeasure for red light and speed camera systems. They can be an economical and somewhat effective type of camera defense, however they may or may not be legal in some states. Check the state license plate laws for your jurisdiction before you invest in one of these countermeasures.

    What do you think? Are red light cameras safety devices, or safety hazards? Are red light cameras unethical? Leave your comments below.

  • Radar detectors with red light camera detection

    Radar Detector with Red Light Camera DetectionRed light cameras are the bane of many drivers, and can make some of them quite anxious. This can be especially stressful when traveling through an unfamiliar area where red light camera systems may be installed, but not advertised.

    Is that device above the traffic light or on top of the post at the next intersection a DOT traffic monitor? Or is it a red light camera, waiting to flash your photo for a ticket as you pass?

    There are so many different sensors and tech gadgets attached to poles and installed around streets these days, Sometimes it is difficult to tell. Until you get that ticket in the mail, you won't know for sure, and then it's too late.

    But it doesn't have to be that way. There is tech available to help you defend against red light and speed cameras. There is also a device that can help you get ahead of the curve, or the intersection, so to speak. You may already have one, but if you don't it's a good time to get one. It's a radar detector with red light camera detection.

    Here is a list of radar detectors currently available Buy Radar Detectors in 2019 that can detect and/or alert you to threats from intersections equipped with red light camera systems.

    Radar Detectors with Traffic Camera Detection
    Brand Model Detects Speed Camera Detects Red Light Camera Built-in Database
    Cobra
    DSP 9200BT
    Escort Redline EX
    Redline iX
    MAX 360c
    Radenso XP
    Pro M
    Uniden DFR9
    R3
    R7
    Whistler
    5075EXS
  • State License Plate Laws

    License Plate CoverLicense plate frames can be a fun and creative way to decorate or customize your vehicle and add that personal touch. If you're searching for a solution to those pesky red light and speed cameras, an anti-photo license plate cover could be exactly what you need. However, before you pick out a frame or cover, check the local statutes in your area. There may or may not be some restrictions, depending on the laws in your state.

    It is especially important to be mindful of the laws and regulations in each individual state governing license plates when traveling, as they can vary greatly from one state to the next. A license plate frame or cover allowed in your state may be restricted or even illegal in another. If you commute between two states or plan to take a cross-country trip, what was perfectly legal or permitted in your state could get you into trouble once you cross the state line.

    The chart below lists US laws, statutes and regulations regarding the use of license plate covers, frames and shields by state.

    Note: The information contained in this chart was based on information provided by Cruiser Accessories in 2018 and is made available for general informational purposes only. Please refer to the proper authority in your state for the most current and complete laws and regulations regarding the use of license plate covers and frames.

    License Plate Laws by State
    State Plate Shields Plate Frames Visibility Comments
    Alabama Yes Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    "Alabama" must be clearly visible at top of plate
    Alaska Yes Yes Must be visible at all times
    Arizona Yes Yes Must be clearly
    legible and visible
    "Arizona" must be clearly visible at top of plate
    Arkansas Yes Yes Must be
    clearly legible
    Covers that make the license plate difficult to read
    or reduces its reflective properties
    are prohibited
    California NO Yes Must be
    clearly visible
    Red light/speed camera license plate covers
    are also prohibited
    Colorado Clear only Yes Must be clearly visible Covers that shield or impair the reading
    of a license plate by devices
    are also prohibited
    Connecticut Yes Yes Must be visible Covers cannot obscure or impair visibility
    Delaware Clear only Yes Must be
    clearly readable
    Red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are also prohibited
    District of Columbia NO Yes clearly and distinct Identification tags must be clearly legible
    Florida Yes Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    Red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are prohibited
    Georgia Clear only Yes Must be plainly visible Red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are prohibited
    Hawaii Yes Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    Plates must be unobscured at all times
    Idaho Yes Yes Must be free of foreign materials
    and visible at all times
    Plates must be clearly visible and legible
    Illinois NO Yes Must be clearly visible anti red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, devices, etc. are prohibited
    Indiana Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Plates must be free of foreign materials
    Iowa Yes Yes Permit full view of numbers and letters Frames must permit full view of all numbers and letters on registration plate
    Kansas NO Yes Must be clearly legible license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are prohibited
    Kentucky Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Frames and covers must permit
    full view of all numbers and letters
    on plate
    Louisiana Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Plates must be free of foreign materials
    Maine Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Plates, letters and numbers must be clearly visible at all times
    Maryland NO Yes Must be
    clearly visible
    No tinted, colored, painted, marked, clear or illuminated object designed to distort the characters on a license plate is allowed
    Massachusetts NO Yes Must be
    displayed conspicuously
    license plate covers, shields, etc. are prohibited
    Michigan Yes Yes Must be
    clearly visible
    Plates must be free of foreign materials
    Minnesota NO Yes Must be
    plainly visible
    No clear or colorless material that affects plated visibility or reflectivity is allowed
    Mississippi Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Plates, letters and numbers must not be covered by any object, marking, paint, etc.
    Missouri Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Covers may not impair reflective qualities of plate
    Montana Yes Yes Must be obviously visible "Montana" and border outline of state must be clearly visible
    Nebraska Yes Yes Must be visible All letters, numbers, etc. on plates must be free from grease dust and other blurring matter
    Nevada Yes Yes Readable from 100 ft. Plates must be clearly legible and free from foreign material
    New Hampshire Yes Yes Displayed conspicuously Plates must be clean and not be obscured
    New Jersey Yes Yes Displayed conspicuously sale or use of anti red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, devices, etc. are prohibited
    New Mexico Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be clearly legible and free from foreign material
    New York NO Yes Must be visible sale or use of anti red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, substances, etc. are prohibited
    North Carolina Yes Yes Plainly readable from 100 ft. No clear or colorless material that affects plate visibility or legibility is allowed
    North Dakota Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be clearly visible and letters and numbers must not be obscured
    Ohio Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be not be covered by any material that obstructs visibility
    Oklahoma NO NO Must be
    clearly visible
    No plate frame, cover or material is allowed
    Oregon NO Yes Plain view
    and easily read
    Any frame or plate holder that alters the plate or makes the numbers, letters or regtistration stickers difficult to read or unreadable is prohibited
    Pennsylvania NO Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    Red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are prohibited
    Puerto Rico Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be not be covered by any material that obstructs visibility
    Rhode Island Yes Yes Clearly visible Plainly readable from 100 ft.
    South Carolina No Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    No tinted covers allowed
    South Dakota Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be clearly visible and letters and numbers must not be obscured
    Tennessee No Yes Clearly visible No tinted covers allowed and plates must be clearly visible with no foreign materials
    Texas Yes Yes No reflective matter or blurring of the plate and plates must be free of foreign material and clearly legible
    Utah Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be free of foreign material and clearly visible
    Vermont No Yes Plainly legible No tinted covers allowed and plates must be plainly legible at all times
    Virginia Yes Yes Clearly visible
    and legible
    No colored frame or covers allowed and plates must be clearly visible and legible
    Washington Yes Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    Unlawful to use frames or covers that change, alter or obscure any portion of the plate or make it illegible
    West Virginia Yes Yes Clearly legible Plates must be free of foreign materials and clearly legible
    Wisconsin Yes Yes Clearly legible Plates must be at all times be maintained in a legible condition
    Wyoming Yes Yes Clearly legible Plates must be free of foreign materials and clearly legible

    The information in the chart above is a basic overview and is provided courtesy of Cruiser Accessories. For the full chart, download their State License Plate Laws - 2018.

    Comments, questions? Leave a comment below. If you're shopping for camera defense solutions or license plate frames and need assistance, contact us and we'll be happy to help!

  • Photo enforcement license plate covers and Veil G5 Stealth Coating

    Veil G5 Stealth Coating can be combined with a radar and laser detector for a more effective solution against police laser guns. It can also work with OnTrack license plate covers such as the Photo Blur for a more complete protection system.

    In this exclusive video interview with The Veil Guy, Danny Feemster from Buy Radar Detectors talks with Bob Rosania, CEO of Veil Corporation and asks him what he thinks of using Veil G5 with OnTrack License Plate Covers such as the Photo Blur, Super Protector and Laser Shield.

  • How To Remove Veil G5

    Veil G5 Stealth Coating is a highly effective deterrent to police laser threats when applied to headlights and other reflective surfaces of your vehicle. In a previous video, we show you how to properly apply Veil G5 for maximum effectiveness. But, how do you remove it?

    In this video, Danny Feemster from Buy Radar Detectors shows you how to quickly and easily remove Veil G5 from an OnTrack Photo Blur license plate cover. The Veil G5 / Photo Blur Combo is an effective solution for laser detectors and red light cameras.

  • How To Apply Veil G5

    Veil G5 Stealth Coating is a translucent liquid specifically designed to defend against police laser threats. When properly applied to headlights and other reflective surfaces of your vehicle, Veil G5 is highly effective at reducing the range of a laser gun. However, for maximum effectiveness, it must be applied properly.

    In this video, Danny Feemster from Buy Radar Detectors shows you how to apply Veil G5 to an OnTrack Photo Blur license plate cover. The Veil G5 / Photo Blur Combo is a great deterrent to laser detectors and red light cameras.

  • Protection from IR traffic enforcement cameras

    Infrared, or IR as it is also known, is electromagnetic radiation that is at the edge of the spectrum of light visible by humans (above 720 nm wavelength). Devices utilizing IR, such as infrared photography cameras and night vision goggles, allow users to see objects under low-light conditions. Such devices are particularly useful for surveillance, especially when stealth is important. The flash from an IR photographic camera is usually not noticeably visible to the naked eye, yet can provide a reasonably identifiable image of an object at night. Given these advantages, an IR camera may be a logical choice for use in traffic enforcement in some locations, such as intersections where red light cameras are in use.

    IR cameras are commonly used overseas in the UK, Sweden, Czech Republic, Norway, Brazil, Germany, Italy, Spain, Australia and other countries. While not yet used extensively in the US, they are apparently installed in some local jurisdictions. Because of their stealth qualities, it isn't always easy to tell where they are being used. The best way to tell if an IR camera is installed at an intersection is, of course, at night. If the intersection is a known location for red light cameras and there is no bright flash or only a faint red one when they are tripped, there are likely IR cameras in use.

    At such intersections, night vision surveillance and easy to read photos of your vehicle license plate are probably unbeknownst to you, until you get the ticket. It's sneaky, underhanded stuff, to be sure. So how can one deal with an IR camera? How can you elude the spying eyes of Big Brother and protect your wallet from the revenue hungry clutches of the local city or county government? The solution is anti-infrared camera blocking.

    Fortunately there is a product available to block IR cameras from detecting the content on your vehicle license plate: The IR Invisi-Plate from OnTrack.

    The IR Invisi-Plate anti-Infrared Camera License Plate Cover fits neatly over the license plate of your vehicle. It is completely translucent under normal light, so are the numbers on the plate are visible to the naked eye when viewed from any angle. When viewed using infrared photography, however, the Invisi-Plate blocks out the letters and numbers on the plate, effectively removing them from view. According to OnTrack, the Invisi-Plate "is the only anti-photo license plate cover designed to defeat IR cameras from every angle!"

    There is one caveat. While it is itself a stealth solution to a stealth surveillance issue, The OnTrack IR Invisi-plate may not be legal to use in some areas or states. Buy Radar Detectors strongly recommends that you check the laws in your jurisdiction before you purchase the Invisi-Plate for use on your vehicle.

    For those who need protection from traditional photo traffic enforcement cameras, the OnTrack Photo Blur Protector, Super Protector, TollFree Protector and Total Eclipse all work against IR as well.

  • Escort Live! takes radar detection to the next level

    When your radar detector alerts you to an oncoming radar speed trap, every second counts. If it's a laser, chances are the time needed to react before you are tagged has already passed. But what if you could be alerted a minute or miles in advance? Well, now you can.

    Escort has taken radar detection to the next level with a patented system called Escort Live!. This unique system combines over a million active Beltronics and Escort radar detectors, Bluetooth wireless technology, smartphones and a central database to create what they call a "real-time ticket protection network" that can alert you to potential radar and laser threats on the road before you encounter them!

    For instance, someone in your area connected to Escort Live! is driving down a road and their Escort radar detector picks up a radar or laser threat. The alert is immediately transmitted to the ESCORT Live™ network database and the data recorded. A short while later you drive down the same road. Connected to the database, the ESCORT Live™ app on your smartphone receives the data on the previous threat and immediately alerts you to the speed trap, well before you reach it. Now imagine a million or more drivers, their radar detectors all sharing radar and laser threat data with each other across the continent through that same database. Escort has essentially created a "social network" for drivers and their radar detectors!

    Sounds great, but how does one connect a radar detector to a smartphone app in the first place?

    Enter the SmartCord Live!™. It is a power cord and data cable all rolled into one. This is the accessory that connects your Escort or Beltronics radar detector with your smartphone so you can connect to Escort's database and share all that information. SmartCord Live! uses Bluetooth® technology to interface with the ESCORT Live! smartphone app installed on your iPhone or Android smartphone. It comes in two versions, a coiled power cord that plugs into a 12V DC outlet (cigarette lighter) or a Direct Wire cord that is hard wired into your vehicle.

    SCLIVE-1-x.jpgThe SmartCord Live! coiled power cord features a DC vehicle adapter, Mini USB Jack that connects your computer to download software updates, a USB Jack so you can charge another device with the DC adapter simultaneously, a modular connector to connect and power your Beltronics or Escort radar detectors, an alert light, a Power/Bluetooth light, an ESCORT Live! Report Button (Push to manually report alerts to other users or reconnect SmartCord Live! to your smartphone) and a mute button.

    SCDWLIVE.pngThe SmartCord Live! Direct Wire uses a tiny console interface with a Mini USB Jack that connects your computer to download software updates, a modular connector to connect and power your Beltronics or Escort radar detector, an alert light, a Power/Bluetooth light, an ESCORT Live! Report Button (Push to manually report alerts to other users or reconnect SmartCord Live! to your smartphone) and a mute button.

    Both plug-in power cord and direct wire versions offer the real-time ticket protection network, Escort's DEFENDER Database of speed cameras, red light cameras and speed traps, GPS-powered speed-limit data for over-speed alerts, Truelock™ to help eliminate false alerts, the capability to receive live traffic data for your current location and mark locations for future reference.

    Then there is the smartphone app. The ESCORT Live!™ smartphone app is available for both iPhone and Android. It connects to Escort's database to obtain and display the latest information available on speed cameras, speed traps and speed limit data, including band, signal strength and frequency. Previous ESCORT Live™ events tagged across the network are noted with an "approaching live alert" message and an arrow indicating the location direction and distance from the source of the alert. A "heat map" icon marks the coordinate location of the alert and changes color and transparency based on alert relevance. The app can display a compass heading, the speed of your vehicle and over-speed alerts and offers dashboard and map views with customizable settings. You can also use the app to access settings and manage alerts on your radar detector.

    The Escort Live! Android or iPhone app must be connected in order to use these features. The iPhone version works with iPhone 5, iPhone 4S, iPhone 4, and iPhone 3GS using 4.1 iOS or later. The Android Version works with Android OS 2.2 or later.

    SmartCord Live! is compatible with Escort PASSPORT 9500ix, RedLine, and most PASSPORT 8500 X50 Models. These detectors will be updated with the latest software automatically and some models will receive Escort's traffic sensor rejection (TSR) software as well. If you purchased the Passport 8500 X50 before 2008, you should call Buy Radar Detectors Toll Free at 1-800-584-1445 Monday-Friday 8am-6pm ET to determine compatibility before purchase.

  • Defensive Driving Online - Prevention and Cure

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    UPDATE: The web site referenced in this article is no longer available.

    If this is your first time to BuyRadarDetectors.com, welcome. If you're here because you recently got a traffic ticket and didn't have a radar detector, we're sorry to hear that, and we're here to help. We've teamed up with the nationally recognized course Defensive Driving Online For Dummies to help you dismiss tickets from your driving record and keep your insurance premiums low.

    Each year more than 24 million drivers in the US receive a traffic citation. Frequently changing speed limits, new red-light cameras, and unclear road signs make navigating the streets challenging. Naturally, drivers using radar detectors are (far) less likely to receive tickets. According to a leading online traffic school course provider, the average US driver receives a traffic citation (warnings included) every 3.2 years. With the cost of a citation ranging from $90 to $600, it's easy to see how owning a radar detector can help you save money and time.

    Avoiding Future Headaches
    If you believe Benjamin Franklin that "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure", so do we. Online defensive driving and online traffic school courses give drivers a convenient and cost effective way to keep tickets from showing up on their record and impacting their insurance rates. A radar detector goes a step further in helping drivers avoid hearing those unfortunate words "Do you know why I pulled you over?"

    How Defensive Driving For Dummies Works
    While the process for taking online defensive driving courses to dismiss a citation can vary from state-to-state, most follow a basic pattern. That is:

    Step 1: Go to www.DefensiveDrivingForDummies.com and register for the online course. It's self-paced, allowing you to start and stop at your convenience.

    Step 2: Take the course.

    Step 3: When you've completed (and passed) the course, you'll receive you're certificate of completion in the mail.

    Step 4: Avoid another costly ticket by buying a radar detector from BuyRadarDetectors.com.

    Are you Eligible To Take Defensive Driving Online?
    While rules for online traffic school eligibility will vary from state to state, most typically use these five factors:

    1. You have a valid in-state, non-commercial, drivers license or permit;
    2. You have proof of vehicle insurance listing you as the driver;
    3. You were not charged with speeding 25 miles, or more, over the limit;
    4. You were not ticketed in a construction or school zone;
    5. You have not taken (and are not currently attending) a driver safety course to dismiss another ticket.

    For more information go to www.DefensiveDrivingForDummies.com or call 1-800-875-4409.

  • Happy Independence Day!

    Buy Radar Detectors would like to wish you a safe and happy Independence Day! Our offices will be closed for the day on Monday, July 4, 2011. If you need assistance please send us an e-mail, visit our Facebook page or give us a call after 8 AM EDT Tuesday, July 5, 2011 at (800) 584-1445. Please stay safe while traveling, remember to keep your radar detector on and watch your speed.

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