(800) 584-1445CONTACT US
0Item(s)

You have no items in your shopping cart.

Product was successfully added to your shopping cart.

red light camera

  • Are red light cameras unethical?

    Red Light Camera InstallationFew traffic enforcement schemes raise the ire of the modern driver more than electronic ticketing. These systems take several forms, including speed enforcement, toll booth cameras, and the like. One type of ticketing system considered particularly annoying to many drivers, and perhaps even downright dangerous, may also be the most unethical. It's the red light camera.

    The traffic light is crucial to safety at an intersection. It is designed to keep the flow of traffic moving in multiple directions in a regimented and organized way. Of course, the effectiveness of this device depends on the full compliance by every driver to obey traffic light signals, without exception. Go on green, slow and prepare to stop on yellow, and come to a full stop on red. It's a simple concept for drivers to understand and follow, and for most part the system works very well.

    The downside to this system is that it relies on the willingness of every driver to follow the rules completely. The truth is, drivers are not machines, they are human, and being human, they do not always follow the rules. If one person does not obey the traffic light signals, particularly when the light turns red, the results can be more than just disruptive, they can be deadly.

    For this reason, there are laws to ensure compliance by all drivers, and law enforcement agencies invoke tickets, fines and other penalties to deter those drivers who violate them.

    Unfortunately, things happen, sometimes intended, sometimes not, and a driver may run a red light, placing that individual and everyone else around at risk.

    Enter the red light camera. Cameras are placed at an intersection to monitor red light runners and catch them in the act, recording their moving violation for ticketing electronically by mail.

    At the outset, the concept of the red light camera is a logical one, an almost foolproof, technologically advanced solution to purportedly save lives. In fact, studies have shown that in many cases, red light camera ticketing systems reduced the number of front and side collisions at intersections by as much as thirty percent! Certainly there is no downside to that!

    But like every coin, there is another side to the story. In addition to tickets, red light cameras also generate ticket revenue, a lot of revenue. Red light camera systems bring in millions to the companies that operate them, and contribute serious cash to city coffers and municipalities that allow them to be installed.

    On the surface, that doesn't seem like such a bad deal. Enforce the traffic laws, save lives, and profit in the process. It's a win-win, right?

    Well, not exactly. In many situations, it's more like a win-lose.

    For one, The companies that install and operate these devices are not law enforcement agencies, nor are they DOT engineers. Yet, it seems that the contracts with these companies allow them to have a lot of latitude in the decisions as to where and how these red light cameras are installed and used.

    One would think that these red light cameras would be placed at the intersections which need them the most to deter violators and increase traffic safety. Some of these intersections are not always high traffic areas, they are simply more dangerous and prone to accidents caused by red light runners.

    Instead, more often than not, the cameras wind up installed at the busiest intersections rather than the most dangerous ones, with the placement simply based on the volume of traffic at an intersection, nothing more. Such arbitrary placement raises the suspicion and argument that red light cameras exist to raise revenue, not promote safety, especially when they are installed in cash strapped communities.

    Another issue is the yellow light. The yellow light was initially created as a safety feature of the conventional traffic light system. It exists to warn drivers that the light is about to turn red, allowing the drivers time to prepare for a safe stop.

    But that's not its application at many intersections where red light cameras are installed. To increase the likelihood of catching, or to more accurately put it, ensnaring red light runners on camera, the yellow light is often shortened considerably, sometimes to only one or two seconds, giving the driver little to no preparation at all to safely stop in time. Some drivers have even reported the complete absence of the yellow light, increasing the chances of causing an unintentional violation, an accident, or both.

    And there's more. Other studies have shown that while red light cameras reduce the number of front and side collisions, the number of rear-end collisions actually increase by roughly the same margins, thereby offsetting the reduction of the others. Sometimes known as the bumper car effect, these collisions occur when drivers suddenly slam on their brakes to avoid an instantaneous red light camera trap and get rear ended by one or more vehicles behind them who were also caught by surprise. It is a rather common occurrence and supports the argument that the red light cameras themselves are a safety hazard. It is also a detail often glossed over or omitted from studies performed that favor these devices.

    That's not all. These red light cameras are supposed to catch violators who blow through an intersection after the light turns red. Unfortunately, they are often set up so that drivers who are already in the intersection lawfully when the light changes may be caught and ticketed as well. This can often occur if a driver is stuck in an intersection while waiting to make a left hand turn and oncoming traffic is heavy or the driver yields to pedestrians in the crosswalk towards which the vehicle is turning.

    In addition, the sensors for these red light cameras are often calibrated to detect a vehicle that may cross the stop line at an intersection or overshoot it a little. In this scenario, the vehicle certainly comes to a full stop and doesn't run the light. The driver may have merely misjudged the line, or perhaps overshot it a little bit if the light changed to red without ample warning and forced a sudden stop. In this case, the driver would clearly be attempting to obey the law, but gets ticketed anyway.

    These red light cameras have also been known to catch and ticket drivers who makes a right hand turn at a stoplight, at intersections where it is perfectly lawful to do so. Getting a ticket for obeying the law doesn't exactly generate the warm fuzzies for red light cameras, or for the entities that run them.

    It doesn't help when a red light camera is set up in such a way that it captures the driver of the vehicle that allegedly commits the violation, but tickets the owner of said vehicle and holds that individual liable. The driver and owner are not always one and the same, yet the system doesn't seem to care. This certainly isn't fair, and adds more ammo to the argument that red light cameras do not exist to promulgate safety, prevent accidents or punish transgressors, but simply to produce profit, and as much as possible, any way they can.

    It added points on your license? You weren't at the wheel? Too bad. Sorry for you. It doesn't matter who gets the ticket, as long as it brings in the revenue.

    Of course, these electronic tickets generated from red light cameras can be contested in traffic court. Many are, and often successfully so. However, the tickets are usually priced strategically at a threshold, not to deter red light running, but to maximize the odds that the unlucky recipients will decide to simply pay the ticket instead of disputing it. After all, taking a day off to go to court, especially if it's not in your immediate area, is a hassle. And if you live in another city or another state, it may cost more to make the trip to the courthouse than the ticket is worth.

    The red light camera companies know this. The cities that cater to them know this too. They're not just aware of it. They may even be counting on it.

    The dark alliance between these red light camera companies and the municipalities that patronize them is a troubling one, especially considering some of the practices involved in the installation and operation of these devices in many areas of the country. For municipalities blinded by dollar signs, the lure of easy revenue under the pretense of public safety is difficult to resist. For red light camera companies, their past performance and ethics - or lack of them - clearly indicate it's all about the money.

    Many drivers are exasperated with the red light camera systems, and some are just fed up. They view them as revenue streams for governments while increasing risks on roads. Many consider red light camera systems unethical, and even downright dangerous. Many view them as accidents waiting to happen.

    Fortunately, a few states are listening to drivers, and are addressing the issue of red light cameras by enacting some restrictions on their use, or passing legislation to ban them altogether.

    One state that paved the way was Mississippi. In 2009, the state passed a law to remove existing red light cameras and outlaw the installation of any new ones. Arizona said goodbye to red light cameras the following year. Several other states also banned red light cameras, and many more passed laws to restrict their use to certain locations, jurisdictions or situations.

    The latest state to join the caravan is Texas. In June 2019, Texas banned the use of red light cameras. It also plans to remove existing systems already installed across the state at the end of their contracts. Here is a list of states that currently ban red light cameras.

    Although some states now have laws on the books that prohibit or limit the use of red light cameras, there are many more states that either embrace these devices, or have no laws on their use at all.

    If you live in or visit an area equipped with red light cameras, be mindful when driving through intersections on those roads. Here are a few quick tips to make it past a red light camera lawfully, safely, and avoid a ticket:

    • Be careful when approaching such intersections.
    • Provide as much distance between you and the vehicle ahead as is reasonably possible.
    • Be prepared to stop with little to no warning.
    • Avoid sitting in the middle of an intersection while waiting to make a left hand turn.
    • Don't pull out into an intersection to turn if the light is changing.
    • Avoid leaning past the stop line when stopping at an intersection with a red light.
    • Also, be extremely careful when making a right turn on red. It may be legal, but it may not stop you from getting an electronic ticket anyway.

    Many drivers are particularly anxious about intersections equipped with red light cameras, and try to avoid them altogether when possible. Some intersections have them, others don't, so one may be able to plan a route with a minimum number red light cameras on the way, and in some areas it may be possible change your route to avoid them altogether. This is where a radar detector can help.

    Many radar detectors available today feature red light camera detection. These detectors are usually equipped with a database of all known locations and intersections where red light cameras are installed or actively in use. Here is a list of current radar detectors with red light and speed camera detection.

    There are also products available that offer a countermeasure for red light and speed camera systems. They can be an economical and somewhat effective type of camera defense, however they may or may not be legal in some states. Check the state license plate laws for your jurisdiction before you invest in one of these countermeasures.

    What do you think? Are red light cameras safety devices, or safety hazards? Are red light cameras unethical? Leave your comments below.

  • States that ban red light cameras

    Surveillance CamerasAmong electronic ticketing systems now in use across the US, The red light camera is perhaps the most controversial. It is the bane of many a driver, and can cause considerable anxiety on the road.

    Many state allow red light cameras, and some are quite happy with the revenue they generate. Fortunately for drivers in some states, red light cameras are restricted or outright banned. The latest state to ban red light cameras is Texas.

    In June 2019, the governor of Texas passed a law banning red light cameras in his state. Red light camera systems currently in place will be removed at the end of their contracts.

    Currently eleven states prohibit the use of red light cameras.

    • Arkansas
    • Maine
    • Mississippi
    • Montana
    • Nevada
    • New Hampshire
    • New Jersey
    • South Carolina
    • Texas
    • West Virginia
    • Wisconsin

    Several other states limit their use to certain types of roadways, locations or conditions. Arkansas prohibits the use of red light cameras except in school zone and railroad crossings with an officer present. Nevada prohibits them except when hand held by a law enforcement officer in a law enforcement facility or vehicle.

    If you live in one of the states listed above, no worries. If your state is not on the list, consider buying a radar detector with red light camera detection. Many modern detectors have them. Even if you don't speed, a radar detector can help you navigate and possibly avoid other potential road hazards such as red light cameras at intersections. Here is a list of radar detectors equipped with red light camera detection.

  • Radar detectors with red light camera detection

    Radar Detector with Red Light Camera DetectionRed light cameras are the bane of many drivers, and can make some of them quite anxious. This can be especially stressful when traveling through an unfamiliar area where red light camera systems may be installed, but not advertised.

    Is that device above the traffic light or on top of the post at the next intersection a DOT traffic monitor? Or is it a red light camera, waiting to flash your photo for a ticket as you pass?

    There are so many different sensors and tech gadgets attached to poles and installed around streets these days, Sometimes it is difficult to tell. Until you get that ticket in the mail, you won't know for sure, and then it's too late.

    But it doesn't have to be that way. There is tech available to help you defend against red light and speed cameras. There is also a device that can help you get ahead of the curve, or the intersection, so to speak. You may already have one, but if you don't it's a good time to get one. It's a radar detector with red light camera detection.

    Here is a list of radar detectors currently available Buy Radar Detectors in 2019 that can detect and/or alert you to threats from intersections equipped with red light camera systems.

    Radar Detectors with Traffic Camera Detection
    Brand Model Detects Speed Camera Detects Red Light Camera Built-in Database
    Cobra
    DSP 9200BT
    Escort Redline EX
    Redline iX
    MAX 360c
    Radenso XP
    Pro M
    Uniden DFR9
    R3
    R7
    Whistler
    5075EXS
  • State License Plate Laws

    License Plate CoverLicense plate frames can be a fun and creative way to decorate or customize your vehicle and add that personal touch. If you're searching for a solution to those pesky red light and speed cameras, an anti-photo license plate cover could be exactly what you need. However, before you pick out a frame or cover, check the local statutes in your area. There may or may not be some restrictions, depending on the laws in your state.

    It is especially important to be mindful of the laws and regulations in each individual state governing license plates when traveling, as they can vary greatly from one state to the next. A license plate frame or cover allowed in your state may be restricted or even illegal in another. If you commute between two states or plan to take a cross-country trip, what was perfectly legal or permitted in your state could get you into trouble once you cross the state line.

    The chart below lists US laws, statutes and regulations regarding the use of license plate covers, frames and shields by state.

    Note: The information contained in this chart was based on information provided by Cruiser Accessories in 2018 and is made available for general informational purposes only. Please refer to the proper authority in your state for the most current and complete laws and regulations regarding the use of license plate covers and frames.

    License Plate Laws by State
    State Plate Shields Plate Frames Visibility Comments
    Alabama Yes Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    "Alabama" must be clearly visible at top of plate
    Alaska Yes Yes Must be visible at all times
    Arizona Yes Yes Must be clearly
    legible and visible
    "Arizona" must be clearly visible at top of plate
    Arkansas Yes Yes Must be
    clearly legible
    Covers that make the license plate difficult to read
    or reduces its reflective properties
    are prohibited
    California NO Yes Must be
    clearly visible
    Red light/speed camera license plate covers
    are also prohibited
    Colorado Clear only Yes Must be clearly visible Covers that shield or impair the reading
    of a license plate by devices
    are also prohibited
    Connecticut Yes Yes Must be visible Covers cannot obscure or impair visibility
    Delaware Clear only Yes Must be
    clearly readable
    Red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are also prohibited
    District of Columbia NO Yes clearly and distinct Identification tags must be clearly legible
    Florida Yes Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    Red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are prohibited
    Georgia Clear only Yes Must be plainly visible Red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are prohibited
    Hawaii Yes Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    Plates must be unobscured at all times
    Idaho Yes Yes Must be free of foreign materials
    and visible at all times
    Plates must be clearly visible and legible
    Illinois NO Yes Must be clearly visible anti red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, devices, etc. are prohibited
    Indiana Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Plates must be free of foreign materials
    Iowa Yes Yes Permit full view of numbers and letters Frames must permit full view of all numbers and letters on registration plate
    Kansas NO Yes Must be clearly legible license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are prohibited
    Kentucky Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Frames and covers must permit
    full view of all numbers and letters
    on plate
    Louisiana Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Plates must be free of foreign materials
    Maine Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Plates, letters and numbers must be clearly visible at all times
    Maryland NO Yes Must be
    clearly visible
    No tinted, colored, painted, marked, clear or illuminated object designed to distort the characters on a license plate is allowed
    Massachusetts NO Yes Must be
    displayed conspicuously
    license plate covers, shields, etc. are prohibited
    Michigan Yes Yes Must be
    clearly visible
    Plates must be free of foreign materials
    Minnesota NO Yes Must be
    plainly visible
    No clear or colorless material that affects plated visibility or reflectivity is allowed
    Mississippi Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Plates, letters and numbers must not be covered by any object, marking, paint, etc.
    Missouri Yes Yes Must be clearly visible Covers may not impair reflective qualities of plate
    Montana Yes Yes Must be obviously visible "Montana" and border outline of state must be clearly visible
    Nebraska Yes Yes Must be visible All letters, numbers, etc. on plates must be free from grease dust and other blurring matter
    Nevada Yes Yes Readable from 100 ft. Plates must be clearly legible and free from foreign material
    New Hampshire Yes Yes Displayed conspicuously Plates must be clean and not be obscured
    New Jersey Yes Yes Displayed conspicuously sale or use of anti red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, devices, etc. are prohibited
    New Mexico Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be clearly legible and free from foreign material
    New York NO Yes Must be visible sale or use of anti red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, substances, etc. are prohibited
    North Carolina Yes Yes Plainly readable from 100 ft. No clear or colorless material that affects plate visibility or legibility is allowed
    North Dakota Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be clearly visible and letters and numbers must not be obscured
    Ohio Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be not be covered by any material that obstructs visibility
    Oklahoma NO NO Must be
    clearly visible
    No plate frame, cover or material is allowed
    Oregon NO Yes Plain view
    and easily read
    Any frame or plate holder that alters the plate or makes the numbers, letters or regtistration stickers difficult to read or unreadable is prohibited
    Pennsylvania NO Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    Red light/speed camera license plate covers, shields, sprays, etc. are prohibited
    Puerto Rico Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be not be covered by any material that obstructs visibility
    Rhode Island Yes Yes Clearly visible Plainly readable from 100 ft.
    South Carolina No Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    No tinted covers allowed
    South Dakota Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be clearly visible and letters and numbers must not be obscured
    Tennessee No Yes Clearly visible No tinted covers allowed and plates must be clearly visible with no foreign materials
    Texas Yes Yes No reflective matter or blurring of the plate and plates must be free of foreign material and clearly legible
    Utah Yes Yes Clearly visible Plates must be free of foreign material and clearly visible
    Vermont No Yes Plainly legible No tinted covers allowed and plates must be plainly legible at all times
    Virginia Yes Yes Clearly visible
    and legible
    No colored frame or covers allowed and plates must be clearly visible and legible
    Washington Yes Yes Must be visible
    at all times
    Unlawful to use frames or covers that change, alter or obscure any portion of the plate or make it illegible
    West Virginia Yes Yes Clearly legible Plates must be free of foreign materials and clearly legible
    Wisconsin Yes Yes Clearly legible Plates must be at all times be maintained in a legible condition
    Wyoming Yes Yes Clearly legible Plates must be free of foreign materials and clearly legible

    The information in the chart above is a basic overview and is provided courtesy of Cruiser Accessories. For the full chart, download their State License Plate Laws - 2018.

    Comments, questions? Leave a comment below. If you're shopping for camera defense solutions or license plate frames and need assistance, contact us and we'll be happy to help!

  • The Cobra iRadar S-Series unveiled!

    In a previous article we took a look at a brand new model in the Cobra iRadar system to be released in May of this year, the iRadar Atom. There is, however, another iteration of iRadar coming right on its heels, one that places the iRadar system in a different category of radar detectors altogether. It's the iRadar S-Series, and it adds another dimension to the product line. Let's take a quick look at it now.

    Cobra_iRadar_S_Series.jpgThe iRadar S200R
    The iRadar S-Series takes the entire iRadar detection concept to the next level - concealed radar detectors. The S-Series (S meaning "Stealth"?) is the first concealed series of detectors utilizing the Cobra iRadar detection system. The first model in the series, the iRadar S200R, is designed to install directly into your vehicle, under the hood, sight unseen.

    Of course, that by itself is nothing new; companies such as Beltronics, Escort and Whistler have been manufacturing internally wired, concealed radar detectors for years. Detection systems such as the Beltronics RX45, the Escort 9500ci and the Whistler Pro 3600 are all well known examples. There's nothing innovative there. Or is there?

    There is. Indeed, there is one thing that sets the new S-Series apart from the rest of them. The iRadar S200R is the first under-the-hood, concealed radar detector to use Bluetooth® technology to connect directly with your smartphone and access an Internet database to exchange information with a million other radar detectors on the road.

    Okay, let's rewind a bit. iRadar? What is it? In a nutshell, it's a web-based network that shares updates and real-time information on known speed traps, red light cameras, speed cameras and other traffic alerts in your area with every driver and radar detector actively connected to it. It sounds a lot like the Escort Live! system, and it is. For details, read our article on the new iRadar Atom.

    Now back to the program. According to Cobra, the new iRadar S200R becomes completely invisible when it's installed under the hood of a vehicle. Now, to me, invisible means that it can't be seen with the naked eye, and if it is installed under the hood of a vehicle, more than likely it won't be visible, literally. However, it doesn't necessarily mean the S200R is undetectable, especially if someone is specifically trying to sense it with a radar detector detector. In fact, Cobra doesn't say that it uses any actual stealth technology at all to avoid detection, it only claims that you can't see it when installed. In other words, don't expect it to be an STi Magnum, because it isn't one. It's just hiding itself from an ocular view.

    With that in mind, it still sounds like a cool device. A concealed radar detector that connects wirelessly to your iPhone or Android smartphone, interfaces with an app and networks in real-time with a million other radar detectors on the road does take radar detection technology up a notch. Whether it lives up to the classic Cobra hype, time will tell. But it does sound cool and it's worth checking out when it arrives, which is supposed to be sometime in August, 2013. Manufacturer suggested retail price: $299.95.

    Subscribe to this blog for the arrival of the new Cobra iRadar S200R at Buy Radar Detectors!

  • Cobra to launch the iRadar Atom in May 2013

    Cobra_iRadar_ATOM.jpgAs we reported earlier, Cobra made several new product announcements for 2013 at the Consumer Electronics Show in January. One of these was the unveiling of a new addition to the Cobra iRadar series of radar detectors, the iRadar Atom. The company previewed the new device along with other entries in its new product line-up, including the soon-to-be-launched Cobra SPX Radar Detectors, due out this April.

    The Atom is based on Cobra's iRadar system, which combines a radar detector with a smartphone app to allow users to share detection alerts with one another in real time. It is essentially the same basic concept as the Escort Live! system. Both systems work by connecting a radar detector to either an iPhone or Android smartphone running a specialized app to communicate with an Internet database to report and receive data on traffic enforcement activities and threats in the area. This data is shared with other drivers also connected with the system, creating a virtual network of real-time radar and laser detection across the continent.

    Both systems do essentially the same thing, with one difference. The Escort Live! system relies on an external, modular type of connection to create an interface between the detector and the smartphone, while the iRadar integrates the wireless interface internally into the detector itself. There are advantages to each design, however when it comes to installation and portability, the iRadar has a slight edge.

    There have been a couple of iterations of the Cobra iRadar, each improving on the last. The original iRadar was launched in 2010, beating Escort to the punch by roughly a year, and was fairly well received. After Escort Live! was launched, Cobra updated their own system with the iRadar 200, which according to Cobra, became wildly popular.

    iRadar-Hardware.pngThe iRadar Atom
    Now Cobra is about to introduce its latest version, the iRadar Atom. Cobra is touting it as the smallest and most powerful radar/laser/camera detection system they have ever developed, and the most compact radar detector on the market. Cobra claims the new Atom is 35% smaller in size than their other models in the iRadar series. The first model in the series came in two versions: the iRadar 100 (iPhone) and the iRadar 105 (Android). Each was a sleek, slim device measuring 1.15 in. x 2.92 in. x 4.22 in. According to dimensions provided by Cobra, the Atom measures 1.15 in. x 2.25in. x 3.30in. If these measurements are correct, it would indeed be one of the smallest, if not the smallest working radar detectors available today.

    Of course, size may be relevant, but it is what is inside the package that really counts. So let's check the feature set.

    Detects all radar and laser guns. Check. This is the most basic function of a radar detector, is it not? How well it detects them remains to be seen, but at least, to some degree, Cobra has this one covered.

    Provides 360 degree detection. Check. Okay, wait. 360 degree detection of what? Radar, laser or both? We are assuming it's laser here, but it isn't specifically defined on Cobra's web site, so who knows. Just to be safe, we're going with laser only.

    4 City/Highway Modes. Check. These modes allow you to customize the sensitivity levels to help reduce false alerts. Another important, but standard feature that is all but expected from nearly all radar detectors worth their cost these days.

    Well, those are all really basic features. That's not much to write home about at all, as radar detectors go. But that's only a third of the entire system.

    Cobra_iRadar_App_3.1 - Tools.jpgThe Cobra iRadar App
    This brings us to the iRadar app. This is a free app that is downloaded to the second device in the system, your iPhone or Android™ smartphone. Once the app is downloaded, it connects and communicates with the iRadar detector via Bluetooth from the smartphone. Your phone becomes part of the iRadar Atom, serving as both display and control center. Cobra recently announced plans to release version 3.1, with tweaks and new features to further improve the overall iRadar experience. The feature set provided by this app enhances the basic features of the hardware and makes the iRadar Atom - and your phone - a lot more powerful.

    The iRadar app provides visual alerts from the Cobra iRadar detector itself, effectively serving as a graphic interface for your radar detector, complete with a tools menu, map view, live traffic view and a car finder function. The app adds GPS capability provided by the smartphone to monitor vehicle speed, direction and location. It even monitors vehicle battery voltage. It also displays live radar and laser alerts, information and locations of red light cameras, speed cameras and speed traps. It does this utilizing the third piece of the iRadar system, Cobra's AURA™ database.

    The AURA™ Database
    To complete the iRadar system, Cobra created the AURA™ database, a repository of speed and red light camera notifications, live police locations and other alerts reported by users connected to the network. Access to the database allows users to exchange locations of live police speed traps, speed cameras, red light cameras, and "caution" areas such as dangerous intersections with other members of the iRadar community. According to Cobra, this online iRadar Community boasts nearly one million users, generating 40,000 reports per day.

    These components don't offer much protection on their own. However, when connected together, the iRadar Atom, the app and the AURA™ database combine to become one very powerful radar detection system. All things considered, the iRadar Atom may be small, but when used as intended, it can be a potentially powerful radar/laser/red light camera detector for any driver.

    The iRadar Atom is expected to be available May 2013 at the manufacturer's suggested retail price of $199. Stay tuned to the Buy Radar Detectors blog for its official release.

6 Item(s)